The Disease: “Alcohol use disorder is a highly prevalent, highly comorbid, disabling disorder that often goes untreated in the United States.”

Standard

 Twelve-month and lifetime prevalence of AUD were 13.9% and 29.1%, respectively.

  • men (17.6% and 36.0%, respectively),
  • white (14.0% and 32.6%, respectively)
  • Native American (19.2% and 43.4%, respectively
  • younger (26.7% and 37.0%, respectively)
  • previously married (11.4% and 27.1%, respectively)
  • never married (25.0% and 35.5%, respectively) adults.

Prevalence of 12-month and lifetime severe AUD was greatest among respondents with the lowest income level (1.8% and 1.5%, respectively).

Significant disability was associated with 12-month and lifetime AUD and increased with the severity of AUD.  Only 19.8% of respondents with lifetime AUD were ever treated.

Significant associations were found between 12-month and lifetime AUD and other substance use disorders, major depressive and bipolar I disorders, and antisocial and borderline personality disorders across all levels of AUD severity… Associations between AUD and panic disorder, specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder were modest

The NESARC-III data indicate an urgent need to educate the public and policy makers about AUD and its treatment alternatives, to destigmatize the disorder, and to encourage those who cannot reduce their alcohol consumption on their own, despite substantial harm to themselves and others, to seek treatment.

  • respondents with educational levels less than high school had greater odds of severe and lower odds of mild 12-month AUD.
  • Conversely, respondents with educational levels of high school or less had lower odds of any, mild, and moderate lifetime AUD than those with postsecondary education.
  • Regardless of severity, the odds of 12-month but not lifetime AUD were greater among respondents living in urban areas.
  • the odds of AUD were lower in the Northeast and South than in the West.
  • AUD was associated with other substance use disorders, major depressive and bipolar I disorders, and antisocial and borderline PDs across time frames and severity
  • Lifetime AUD was associated with persistent depression (except moderate severity), panic disorder (except mild severity), specific phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder (except moderate severity). Any and severe lifetime AUD were associated with posttraumatic stress disorder.
  • When we adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity, respondents with 12-month AUD had significantly lower Mental Health, Social Functioning, Role Emotional, and Mental

Study findings indicate a lower risk for AUD among black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and Hispanic than white respondents.

We generally found significant associations between 12-month and lifetime AUD and other substance use disorders, major depressive disorder, bipolar I disorder, specific phobia, and antisocial and borderline PDs when we controlled for sociodemographic characteristics and other disorders.  Significant associations between persistent depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder with lifetime AUD were also observed.

Because some population segments were not covered (ie, homeless individuals, prisoners, and most treated individuals), estimates presented herein may underestimate the true prevalence of AUD

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