Childhood Neglect and Abuse Has Lifelong Genetic Affects – Sadly

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Tough times in childhood ‘mark’ many genes

Adversity during childhood can affect broad regions of brain DNA in both rodents and humans, according to research. The findings offer strong evidence for a biological process that embeds social experience in DNA—affecting not just a few genes but entire gene networks.

MCGILL (CAN) — There’s a remarkable similarity in the way the DNA in human brains and the DNA in animal brains respond to early life adversity.

Tough times during childhood result in a broad change in the way our DNA is “epigenetically” chemically marked in the brain by a coat of small chemicals called methyl groups, according to researchers at McGill University.

“Our data highlights the immense importance of the social environment during childhood and illustrates the profound consequences of child adversity on the way our DNA is programmed,” says Moshe Szyf, a professor of pharmacology and therapeutics and a fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR).

The research, published in a special volume of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, confirms a biological process that embeds social experience in DNA in the brain and that affects not just a few genes but entire networks of genes.

Although it has been known that early life experiences, particularly social experiences, have long-term impacts on future physical and mental health well-being, it was difficult to understand how these adversities were “embedded” biologically.

While previous McGill studies had shown that a few candidate genes could be “epigenetically” marked by early life experiences, it was clear that early life experience had a profound impact on health that couldn’t be explained by these few genes.

“This study provides strong evidence of a biological process that embeds social experience in DNA in the brain that affects not just a few genes but entire networks of genes,” says Szyf.

“We highlighted the immense importance of the social environment during childhood and illustrated the profound consequences of child adversity on the way our DNA is programmed. Because of our new findings, we now have a broader understanding of how to prevent and treat mental and physical health challenges”.

 

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