“Between 1820 and 1860, it is estimated that more than 2 million enslaved people were sold in the American slave trade.” US population in 1840 – 17mm.

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lavery paintings gave abolition back-up

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Detail from “Slaves Waiting for Sale, Richmond, Virginia” by Eyre Crowe (1861). His paintings and illustrations reveal “the power of images in helping viewers then, and today, to see the slave trade in new ways and thus helped to spread anti-slavery sentiment,” Crowe’s painting of 1861, “Slaves Waiting for Sale, Richmond, Virginia,” depicts nine slaves as the focus of the painting and captures the “individual emotional cost of American slavery,” and is an “unusual image that had never been seen before,” McInnis says.

U. VIRGINIA (US) — A British artist’s paintings of the American slave trade reveal the emotional side of slavery that U.S. artists were more hesitant to depict at the time.

Although the international slave trade was abolished in the United States in 1808, the trading of slaves within the states remained big business, boosting the economy by tens of millions annually in the 1850s. Between 1820 and 1860, it is estimated that more than 2 million enslaved people were sold in the American slave trade. [ed. Total population in US in 1840 17mm] Continue reading

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The group most likely to see itself as impervious and others as vulnerable was composed of people with a personality trait called right-wing authoritarianism. People with this trait strongly value tradition and authority, and dislike people not in their own social group.

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“third-person perception,” a common psychological bias in which people are convinced that others are much more influenced by outside sources such as media and advertising than they themselves are. In the realm of same-sex marriage, people who strongly value authority and tradition were the most likely to demonstrate this third-person effect.

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